Archive for March 5, 2014

TEACHING TO READ AND WRITE CHILDREN WITH DOWN’S SYNDROME: CONCLUSIONS

March 5, 2014

The results of this research showed that learning literacy in children with mild to moderate mental retardation can be facilitated by using PCS pictographic symbols. The reading skills are closely connected with writing skills, such as long memory and short-term, cognitive development, levels of attention and concentration (Byrne, Buckley, MacDonald & Bird, 1995; Buckley, 2001; Del Cerro, 1991; Henao, Ramirez & Giraldo, 2003). And so effectively demonstrated statistical results with respect to the first hypothesis, the intervention group obtained a relevant difference of 34 % in their favor compared to the control group.

Although this research came to results that indeed all the children involved in this study achievements made during the intervention process, the use of pictograms PCS was support or relevant results. Especially, in the aspects of “repetition of phrases”, “visual differentiation of words and symbols”, “speaking”, “graphic expression” and “line drawing”.

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TEACHING TO READ AND WRITE CHILDREN WITH DOWN’S SYNDROME: METHOD

March 3, 2014

METHOD

Participants

In this study participated twenty four children with Down syndrome (Trisomy 21): eight females and sixteen males, they were Colombian school children from the Region Boyaca (central Colombia). The children were aged between 6 years and 12 years old. They were selected on the basis of a Down syndrome diagnostic, on the basis of IQ between 45 and 70, on the basis of speech of two or more words and on the basis that the children the ability to difference for listening information. Assessments on the WISC-RM, Wechsler Intelligence scale for children, (Gomez Palacio, Padilla, & Roll, 1983) were conducted all children and indicated that twelve children had an IQ between 49 and 55, and eleven had an IQ between 57 and 66.

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TEACHING TO READ AND WRITE CHILDREN WITH DOWN’S SYNDROME: Phonological Awareness

March 1, 2014

Since the 70s it starts to establish the relationship between ‘phonological awareness’ and ‘Early Reading’ (vgl. Stahl & Murray, 1994:221). Some researchers have taken the view that the development of phonological awareness is a prerequisite for the start of reading (Coltheart, Curtis, Atkins & Haller, 1993; Liberman, Shankweiler, Fisher & Carter, 1974; Liberman & Shankweiler, 1977). Other authors, however, maintained the position that literacy learning is a sequence of stages or phases through which the child must traverse, and that it has developed not necessarily the acquisition of phonological awareness for learning to read and writing (Frith, 1985; Ferreiro & Teberosky, 1982; Jimenez, Rodrigo, Hernandez, 1999; Brugelmann, 1986; Gunther, 1989; Schereer – Neuman, Valtin, 1993).

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